Category: SSO

Login to Google Apps using PayPal

It was great to see Pam setup and configure PingFederate to accept PayPal OpenID and show login to Google Apps.

The following screen cast illustrates:

  • User accesses integralcurve.com (a Google Apps domain)
  • SAML SP Initiated SSO to PingFederate.
  • PingFed redirects to PayPal OpenID endpoint for authentication.
  • User authenticates at PayPal.com.
  • PingFed accepts PayPal OpenID response, creates a SAML assertion and redirects to integralcurve.
  • User is logged in to integralcurve.

Another feature that’s not shown here is to configure the solution for user’s to select their own IdP at run time. This can potentially allow Google Apps hosted enterprises to offer their employees a handful of IdP options (PayPal, Enterprise AD, Facebook…) and let the employees pick the one they feel most comfortable with.

SAML SSO using PayPal

One of the benefits of using Open standards is the interoperability with other product and solutions. I connected with the Intel Cloud Access 360 team during IIW. And it took less than an hour to hook up PayPal Authentication to Google Apps and Salesforce login via SAML.

The following screen cast illustrates how Intel Cloud Access 360 can
a. initiate OpenID request to PayPal
b. accept PayPal OpenID response
c. create a SAML assertion with appropriate attributes to login into Salesforce.com

OAuth vs WS-Trust/WS*

I moderated a session at the recent SSO Summit titled “What is OAuth and WS-Trust, and where does it fit into your web services SSO initiatives“.

User-centric identity” is past-its-prime and “Identity as a Service‘ has already been beaten enough. And hence I was glad to get a chance to dig into the services/API use cases (some of the which are very complementary to the browser SSO use cases).

Here are some of the scenarios that we discussed:
(Eve was the scribe…so I’m hoping  she has better notes).

  • Server-2-Server mashup – User goes to travelsite.com and books his flight. And expects the travel site to make an API call and add an event to his Google Calendar.
  • Enterprise SOA  – An enterprise had a legacy/maiinframe system. An overpriced consultant convinced them to put an SOA layer in front and expose the functions via a web application. The user logs in the web application (SSO or otherwise), makes an API call to the SOA layer and the system requires the call to be ‘identity enabled’ for security as well as audit purposes.
  • SSO + Data (User present) – User login to flight.com. Books his flight. SSO to hotel.com. Hotel.com has the username but requires the flight information – dates etc (transient data) to auto-populate the reservation fields. Hotel.com makes an API call back to flight.com to retrieve the data.
  • Desktop Client – SaaS vendor (think Salesforce etc) has a web front, which the customer uses to access their data. The SaaS vendor also makes the data available via an API (which can then be leveraged via an Outlook or Eclipse plug-in or a mobile version). SAML handles the browser based SSO use cases but the it gets tricky for desktop based clients when there is no browser present. The consumer equivalent of this will be TurboTax or MS-Money, which currently ask the users to enter their FI credentials to allow them to retrieve data on user’s behalf.

The OAuth vs WS-Trust/WS* has many similarities to the OpenID vs SAML debate. Much like OpenID, OAuth was started in the consumer centric world. Both the protocols boasts to be light weight, focus on limited set of use cases and does it very well. SAML as well as WS-Trust/WS* have roots in the enterprise world, require an engineering degree to be able to understand the specs but they are much ahead in terms of maturity and have gone through many security reviews.

However, in the case of OpenID / SAML, there seems be to a resting state -  OpenID is the front-runner in the blog/consumer/social networking space (MySpace, Orange recently announced support for it) and SAML is the defacto in the enterprise as well as SaaS space (Google, and recently Salesforce announced support for SAML).

In the case of OAuth/WS-Trust, it’s a little less clear. OAuth seems to have a lot of traction in the consumer space (twitter, flickr, pownce etc). WS-Trust/WS* has better adoption in the conventional enterprise web services/ SOA space. However, the enterprise SaaS space is still open. The likes of Google Apps are trying to merge the lines between the consumer and the enterprise market. Google GData API recently announced support for OAuth (it supports SAML for browser SSO). And hence an enterprise with a traditional SAML/WS-Trust/WS-* infrastructure may be tempted/required to have OAuth support to access their data. Or they may ask their SaaS vendors to enable their APIs with WS*.

Overheard on “SSO”

So you want to be a millionaire? That’s easy. First, you get a million bucks…

So you want a secure SSO system? That’s easy. First, you get an authenticated user…

Image | WordPress Themes